Fincantieri Takes 66.66% Of STX France – Carnival Maritime Opens Third Centre – European Cruise Market To Grow 60% In A Decade

The Cruise Examiner for 22nd May 2017

STX France

Fincantieri has acquired a two-thirds shareholding in the famous STX France shipyard at St Nazaire

Last Friday it was announced that Fincantieri was acquiring a 66.66% shareholding in STX France, a company that will no doubt soon be renamed. The balance of the shares are held by the French State. At the same time, following the opening of Fleet Operations Centres in Hamburg and Seattle, Carnival Maritime has started hiring for a third such centre in Miami to manage the twenty-five ships of original group member Carnival Cruise Line. Meanwhile, Cruise Industry News Annual predicts 60% growth in the European cruise market over the next decade.

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Monfalcone Shipyard Shut For Almost A Week – A New Ship For Hurtigruten – Crystal’s New Expedition Ship?

THE CRUISE EXAMINER at Cybercruises.com by Kevin Griffin

The Cruise Examiner for 6th July 2015

MegaStar Taurus

Will Star Cruises’ little 72-berth MegaStar Taurus join the newly-acquired Crystal Cruises fleet under a new name?

Last week saw the closure of Fincantieri’s main shipyard at Monfalcone due to a court order seizing certain portions of the yard used to store waste products. A government decree was then passed on Friday so that work can recommence at the yard, which is building two large cruise ships for Carnival and Princess plus the first of its new Seaside class for MSC. Meanwhile, Hurtigruten has acquired a passenger vessel in Portugal that it intends to convert to an expedition ship and unconfirmed rumours from Singapore have Star Cruises’ luxury small ship Megastar Taurus about to join the Crystal fleet.

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The “99,000-Tonners”: Mein Schiff 3 and Koningsdam – Chinese Finance For Silversea Three – Carnival Develops Its China Hand

THE CRUISE EXAMINER at Cybercruises.com by Kevin Griffin

The Cruise Examiner for 27th October 2014... ..

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Mein Schiff 3 © Frank Behling

ms Mein Schiff 3 – the first 99,000-tonner

This week we examine a new class of ship that is presenting itself – the “99,000-tonner” – embodied in Mein Schiff 3 and Koningsdam Not a mega ship, but still larger than we are used to, these new ships seem to offer the prospect of trying to fill a gap in the quality end of the premium cruise market. Elsewhere, while Silversea has not said anything, news has leaked from China about a potential €800 million financing deal for three new ships to be built by Fincantieri. And in a continuation of this “Marco Polo” theme, Carnival Corp & plc has announced an agreement with China State Shipbuilding Corporation to design the optimum cruise ship for China, an agreement to which Fincantieri might also become a party.

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The Evolution of Cruise Ship Design – Noble Caledonia Goes To Three Ships – Louis Expands in France and Canada

THE CRUISE EXAMINER at Cybercruises.com by Kevin Griffin

The Cruise Examiner for 9th June 2014..

MSC Seaside design

The illustrations for the new MSC “Seaside” class from Fincantieri have provoked some discussion on recent changes in cruise ship design, which we examine today. Elsewhere, Noble Caledonia last week also announced that it was acquiring a third unit of the original eight-ship 114-berth Renaissance small ship class, and the third of four sister ships from the Apuania shipyard south of La Spezia. Meanwhile, Louis Cruises is out to triple its French business to 10,000 passengers and has announced a second season for the Louis Cristal on charter to Cuba Cruise from Havana.

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Image courtesy of Fincantieri