Lindblad Orders X-Bow Ship – New Chinese Cruise Ship Concept – Shell Cruising With LNG And Carnival

The Cruise Examiner for 13th November 2017

Lindblad Ulstein order

Lindblad Expeditions has ordered a 138-berth X-Bow ship, with options for two more

Lindblad Expeditions has now joined Aurora Expeditions in ordering a new 138-berth X-Bow expedition ship in Norway. The similar Aurora ship is being built in China. Elsewhere, current ferry builder Guangzhou Shipyard has exhibited a new design for a mid-sized cruise ship at the China Cruise Shipping event in Sanya last week and Carnival Cruise Line and Shell have announced an agreement for LNG bunker barge fuelling of two new ships in order for Carnival Cruise Line.

FOR THIS WEEK’S STORY                                                                                        (See previous columns)

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Dual-Fuel LNG Ships For Costa Group – Other Recent LNG Installations – Converting Cruise Ships to LNG

The Cruise Examiner for 3rd August 2015

Costa LNG

In many ways, Costa’s new pair of 180,000-tonners will resemble AidaPrima, now being completed in Japan

Last week’s big news was that Meyer Werft is to build two new next-generation cruise ships for Costa Cruises, which will be the world’s first, and most certainly the largest, to run on LNG. While these will be built at its Turku shipyard, two similar ships will be built at Papenburg for sister company Aida Cruises. By burning LNG, large passenger ships are able to reduce their CO2 emissions by 25%, Nitrogen Oxides by 85 to 90% and Sulphur Oxides to practically nothing. LNG is a clean fuel, producing very low particle emissions, no visible smoke and no sludge. And as a bonus it is cheaper than marine diesel oil. There are problems however. LNG’s volume is 1.8 times that of diesel fuel, and with the necessity of using highly-insulated cylindrical tanks, the space required for bunker storage is almost four times what is required for conventional square tanks.