The Legacy Lines 50 Years Ago – Older Costa Ships Cascading – Ocean Adventurer Has A Remake

The Cruise Examiner for 14th August 2017

Franca C was converted into a diesel-powered cruise ship in 1959

The m.v. Franca C, converted in 1959 into Costa Line’s first dedicated cruise ship, cruised from Port Everglades

Continuing on the theme of fifty years ago that we started a couple of weeks ago with Cunard, this week we look at the legacy lines that survive today. The names of these lines, Cunard, Holland America, Costa and P&O, are all historic, and as it happens they are all owned by Carnival Corp & plc. The only lines outside these direct links are Celebrity Cruises, formed by Chandris Cruises, which is now owned by Royal Caribbean Cruises, and Lauro Lines, which became the foundation of today’s MSC Cruises. Elsewhere, we look at recent fleet announcements from Costa Cruises. And another veteran expedition ship, Ocean Adventurer, gets a remake in Norway and Denmark.

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Mystic Cruises’ World Explorer – Other Cruise News: The Evolution Of A Chinese Ship Type – Fifty Years Ago: All Change At Cunard

The Cruise Examiner for 31st July 2017

 

Queen Mary arrives Long Beach December 9, 1967

Cunard Line’s Queen Mary arrives at Long Beach, California, December 9, 1967

It came as a somewhat of a surprise earlier this month when Quark Expeditions revealed that its 2018-19 Antarctic season would be led by a newbuilding that so far had not caught anyone’s eye. We have a look at Mystic Cruises, who will own the new 176-berth World Explorer, and the Portuguese shipyard it works with in Viana do Costelo. Meanwhile, the new passenger and container ship Ocean Blue Whale has recently entered service in China and we have a look at a ship design that, while particular to China, has also spread to Mauritius and French Polynesia. Finally, it is fifty years since Cunard Line announced that it would withdraw its iconic Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, so we have a look back to Cunard in 1967.

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Cruise Lines Escape US-Cuba Travel Ban – The Flying Clipper Is Launched – Ex-Russian Ship Converted To Expedition Vessel

The Cruise Examiner for 19th June 2017

EmpressOfTheSeasInHavana

Royal Caribbean International’s Empress of the Seas arriving in Havana for the first time, on April 23, 2017

On Friday, in the “Little Havana” neighbourhood of Miami, surrounded by Cuban Americans, President Donald Trump’s words for Cuba were “we will enforce the ban on tourism.” However, his edict will have very little effect on the cruise lines that have been able to return to Cuba in the last year thanks to a loosening of regulations by former president Barack Obama. In Croatia, meanwhile, the world’s largest sailing ship, the 300-passenger Flying Clipper, was launched for Star Clippers. Finally, Sunstone Ships’ 230-berth Ocean Atlantic has recently re-entered service as an expedtion ship.

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Celebrity’s “Edge” Class – Sunstone Announces Chinese X-Bows – Arena Buys River Cruise Line – UK Sets New Cruising Record

The Cruise Examiner for 20th March 2017

Celebrity Edge

The first of the 117,000-ton Celebrity “Edge” class ships enters service from Fort Lauderdale in December 2018.

Last week, on the event of Seatrade Cruise Global in Fort Lauderdale, Celebrity Cruises  released the first detailed images of its five new 2,900-berth “Edge” class ships. Also from Miami comes word of orders for four X-Bow expedition cruise ships for Sunstone Ships. On the other side of the Atlantic, meanwhile, the UK’s Arena Travel announced its acquisition of The River Cruise Line and the UK & Ireland hit a new cruise record with 1.9 million cruisers in 2016, although this is still short of Germany’s 2.02 million.

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The Northwest Passage: Yet Another Cruise Ship For 2017

The Cruise Examiner for 2nd May 2016

Seven Seas Navigator

The Seven Seas Navigator is a cruise ship that was built on an ice-strengthened hull

The fabled Northwest Passage took three years to cross when Raould Amundsen first traversed it from east to west in his Gjoa in 1903-06 and Henry Larsen of the RCMP made it the other way in the St Roch in 1940-42. A century later, however, large passenger ships such as the 43,524-ton residence ship The World and the 68,870-ton cruise ship Crystal Serenity are threatening to turn it into a tourist playground. Last week came news that yet another cruise ship, Regent Seven Seas Cruises’ 28,550-ton Seven Seas Navigator, would join the Crystal Serenity in making the passage in 2017. While Crystal sail from Seward to New York, Regent will be sailing from Seward to Montreal.

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The Cruise Examiner – Expedition Ships: To Convert Or To Build?

The Cruise Examiner for 28th September 2015

Seabourn Quest © Robin West

The Seabourn Quest in Antarctica, in an image by Robin West, Seabourn’s manager of expedition operations

There have been many changes in the field of expedition cruising in recent years. New ships were built, a few of them. Russian ships were chartered, a few more. And ships were converted, variously from small ships, coastal vessels and ice-class ferries. Last week’s announcement by Silversea that it was converting its Silver Cloud into an ice-class ship followed a move two years ago by Seabourn to ice-strengthen its own Seabourn Quest. Meanwhile, ship managers, naval architects and shipbuilders have all come up with various proposals for new designs. First off the block, a few years ago, was Sunstone Ships of Miami with its Project Unlimited. Then, STX France introduced its Ulysseas design this March, and the Danish firm of Knut E Hansen followed up with its own design six months later. This week we look at the two alternatives of converting or building.

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TUI’s Expedition Side – Other Cruise News: Emerald’s Three New Ships – The Windsors’ Cruise To Bermuda and Nassau

The Cruise Examiner for 31st August 2015

Kapitan Khlebnikov

After leaving passenger service for icebreaking in 2012 the Kapitan Khlebnikov is back working for Quark Expeditions again

Two weeks ago, we covered the TUI cruise fleet operated by the TUI Cruises joint venture with Royal Caribbean and the wholly-owned Hapag-Lloyd Cruises and Thomson Cruises. Today, we have a look at TUI’s expedition arm, with ships operated by Toronto-based Quark Expeditions and Seattle-based Zegrahm Expeditions. Emerald Waterways, meanwhile, is about to order three more 172-berth vessels for rivers they do not presently cruise on. And we have a quick look at the Duke and Duchess of Windsor’s cruise from Europe to Bermuda and Nassau seventy-five years ago this month.