Around The World In 77 Days By CMA CGM: From Houston, Mobile, New Orleans, Miami, Jacksonville, Via Singapore, Hong Kong & China

Cma-Cgm-Lamartine-c-Hannes van Rijn

The CMA CGM Lamartine carries up to 8 passengers in four double-bedded cabins

(*) Note: Presently (05.10.17) the Tangier call is being omitted.

The latest news brings better tidings for those looking for a single ship round the world voyage. For North Americans, such voyages will now be available from Houston, Mobile, New Orleans, Miami and Jacksonville, as well as from the Mexican port of Ensenada, near San Diego.  Europeans will be able to board ship at Tangier for the same 77-day circumnavigation. Such voyages have not been readily available since 2011, when the Rickmers Pearl String round-the-world service stopped carrying passengers through the Suez Canal.

We now offer full 77-day Round-the-World freighter cruises from five US ports as well as Ensenada. Full round voyages and one-way trips can also be booked from Tangier,  handy for Europeans with its frequent flights and ferry connections with Gibraltar, Algeciras and other Spanish ports.  Singapore and Hong Kong are also offered for Asia-based travellers and disembarking passengers.

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Three ships operate round the world eastabout from Houston and US Southeast ports, as well as Tangier

There are two routes and the full round-the-world voyage on each takes 77 days, with four passenger-friendly ships now offering a reasonable frequency.

m.v. CMA CGM Lamartine (8 passengers), m.v. Chicago (6 passengers), m.v. Conti Basel (5 passengers): Houston – Mobile – New Orleans – Miami – Jacksonville – Tangier – Singapore – Hong Kong – Shekou – Shanghai – Ningbo – Pusan – Panama City – Houston.

m.v. CMA CGM Jacques-Joseph (8 passengers): Ensenada – Manzanillo – Punta Manzanillo – Cartagena – Kingston – Caucedo – Singapore – Shekou – Hong Kong – Kaohsiung – Ningbo – Shanghai – Qingdao – Pusan – Ensenada.

The fare for the full 77-day circumnavigation starts at €8,585 per person double occupancy, or €9,355 for sole use of a double cabin. Sample one-way fares are Miami to Tangier in 14 days at €1,650 (€1,795 single), Tangier to Singapore in 21 days at €2,425 (€2,635 single), Singapore to Ensenada in 29 days at €3,305 (€3,595 single), Hong Kong to Houston in 31 days at €3,525 (€3,835 single), Houston to Singapore in 42 days at €4,735 (€5,155 single) or Ensenada to Singapore in 48 days at €5,385 (5,875 single). Please apply for other routes.

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A fourth ship operates round the world from Ensenada, Mexico, and Caribbean ports

The next sailing dates follow, with sailings every eleven weeks thereafter:

m.v. CMA CGM Lamartine, from Houston, Tuesday, October 31, 2017
m.v. Conti Basel, from Houston, Tuesday, November 7, 2017
m.v. Chicago, from Houston, Tuesday, December 12, 2017
m.v. CMA CGM Jacques-Joseph, from Ensenada, Thursday, December 21, 2017
m.v. CMA CGM Lamartine, from Houston, Tuesday, January 16, 2018

For further details on these full Round-the-World routes please call Miri Lopusna at The Cruise People Ltd in London on +44 (0)20 7723 2450 or e-mail PassageEnquiry@aol.com

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New Cargo-Passenger Service Between Genoa and Vancouver via the Panama Canal – Two Single Cabins Available – 77-day Round Trip

Cap Jackson © Marine TrafficUpdate 01.11.14:  Hamburg-Süd’s 50,270-ton deadweight container ship Cap Jackson has been assigned to a new cargo-passenger route between Genoa, Fos-sur-Mer, Barcelona and Valencia, by way of Cartagena and the Panama Canal, to Manzanillo, Los Angeles, Oakland, Tacoma and Vancouver. She then returns from Vancouver via Portland, Oakland, Los Angeles and Manzanillo, by way of Panama again, Cartagena and Caucedo, to Lisbon, Tangier, Valencia, Cagliari, Livorno and Genoa. The round voyage takes 77 days while the voyage from Barcelona to Vancouver is 34 days and Vancouver back to Genoa is 40 days. Built in 2010, and sailing from Barcelona this morning (01.11.14) on her way to Vancouver, the Cap Jackson has two single cabins. Fares begin at €6,850 for the round voyage (€7,235 in the Owners single), and €3,195 for the one-way trip from Barcelona to Vancouver (€3,365 in the Owners). Air-conditioned with elevator, both cabins have views to the side of the ship (so no container stow in the way) and age limits are 6 to 79 maximum. This voyage can also be turned into part of a round-the-world routing by linking up with CMA CGM’s Columbus Loop service to the Far East and New York via Suez.

For further details please call Miri Lopusna at The Cruise People Ltd in London on +44 (0)20 7723 2450 or e-mail cruise@cruisepeople.co.uk. Ask about round-the-world cruises as well.

One Hundred Years Ago – The Allan Line’s Alsatian, later Empress of France – Trans-Atlantic – Trans-Pacific – World Cruises

CalgarianAt this time a century ago, Glasgow’s Allan Line, a very innovative company that was among the first to stretch many of its passenger liners by adding new midsections in the 19th Century, was preparing to introduce two new trend-setting ships to the North Atlantic in 1914. The first of these, the 18,481-ton Alsatian, was built by William Beardmore & Sons in Glasgow, while the 17,515-ton Calgarian was completed by the Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co Ltd of nearby Govan.

Ordered as quadruple-screw turbine-propelled vessels, these ships had advanced turbine propulsion for their time and were the first on the North Atlantic to be equipped with the new warship-like cruiser stern instead of the traditional counter stern. With a capacity for 1,750, of whom 250 travelled in first class, 500 in second and 1,000 in third, they were the largest liners yet built for the Canadian route between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal, with winter service to Halifax and Saint John when the St Lawrence was closed by ice.

An Allan Line publicity piece described the ships while they were being built: “The fittings of the general rooms, which occupy the entire structure on A Deck, harmoniously blend luxury and comfort, the decorations being entrusted to firms whose names are world-famous. The public rooms comprise the Lounge, Library and Reading Room, the Card Room, and the Smoke Room. On the Upper Promenade Deck there is a Cafe, Smoke Room and Gymnasium. The promenade decks – which constitute a special feature of the ships – are of great length and spaciousness, with extensive closed-in Promenade for recreation in all kinds of weather.”

The Alsatian departed Liverpool on her maiden voyage on January 17, 1914, for Halifax and Saint John, while the Calgarian would follow on May 22 to Quebec. But their initial service to Canada was but brief.

That summer, with the onset of the Great War, both ships were requisitioned by the Royal Navy for use as armed merchant cruisers. Regrettably, the Calgarian was sunk by a U-Boat off the cost of Northern Ireland on March 1, 1918. This ship had been at the scene of the Halifax Explosion on December 6, 1917, when her crew had assisted in the rescue and medical relief after the French ship Mont Blanc, loaded with explosives, and the Norwegian Imo were in collision in the harbour. More than 2,000 people died in the resulting explosion.

During the conflict, the Allan Line was taken over by Canadian Pacific and in 1919 the Alsatian was refitted as an Atlantic Empress, taking on the new name of Empress of France. Her maiden voyage as an Empress left Liverpool on September 26, 1919, for Quebec. In 1923, she became one of four ships to circumnavigate the world from New York, following Cunard Line’s 19,695-ton Laconia by only a few weeks. The Empress of France made a number of world cruises in the 1920s, as did her fleetmate, the 24,581-ton Empress of Scotland.

In May 1922, the Empress of France became one of the first Canadian Pacific ships to serve Southampton, when her route was changed from Liverpool to sail between Southampton and Quebec via Cherbourg, to which the port of Hamburg was soon added, before Southampton.

Empress of France in VancouverAs well as seeing the Pacific on her world cruises, the Empress of France spent a year in the Trans-Pacific trade when in October 1928, she sailed from Southampton for Suez, Hong Kong and Vancouver (where she is seen above in this Walter E Frost photo). There, she substituted for the 1922-built 21,517-ton Empress of Canada, first of the name, which was sent to Fairfield’s to be re-engined for more speed. The Empress of France sailed Trans-Pacific until October 1929, when she left Hong Kong again for Liverpool.

In September 1931, Empress of France made her final voyage from Southampton to Cherbourg and Quebec.  Having been displaced by the new 42,348-ton Empress of Britain, she was laid up in the Clyde and finally scrapped at Dalmuir, where she had been built, three years later. In all, the first Empress of France had a career that spanned twenty years, which in addition to her war service included ninety-nine Trans-Atlantic voyages, five Trans-Pacific voyages, and eight cruises.

The Cruise People still book world cruises today, not only on Cunard Line but also with other carriers such as Hapag-Lloyd Cruises, with their 28,890-ton Europa and several other lines, as well as on cargo-passenger ships. For further details please call us in London on +44 (0) 20 7723 2450 or e-mail cruise@cruisepeople.co.uk 

Three Cargo Ships On A Round-the-World Itinerary Connected By Rail

For a world cruise that’s different, you can try the French Line CMA CGM. Its Columbus Loop service now offers a total of nine partial world cruises in each direction throughout the year, with the 89,787-ton CMA CGM Dalila, built in 2011, and 90.931-ton CMA CGM Figaro and CMA CGM La Scala, built in 2010.

World Cruises - CMA CGMThese three ships run between New York, Norfolk and Savannah on the East Coast and Seattle and Vancouver on the West Coast, sailing by way of the Suez Canal, or sometimes the Cape of Good Hope, and ports in Malaysia, China, South Korea and Japan.

The only thing is that one must travel by train or plane between the two coasts of the United States in order to complete the full round-the-world circuit.

Ports of call on the way out from New York include Tanjung Pelepas, Hong Kong, Yantian, Shanghai and Pusan, and in the opposite direction back from Seattle, Yokohama, Shanghai, Ningbo, Hong Kong, Yantian and Tanjung Pelepas.

World Cruises - CMA CGM 2013These modern container ships carry seven (7) passengers each in three double cabins and one single. They come equipped with indoor  swimming pools, and meals are taken in the officers’ mess. The fare of €100 per person per day includes full board, port charges, deviation insurance and complimentary French table wine with lunch and dinner. CMA CGM Dalila and CMA CGM Figaro fly the French flag, while CMA CGM La Scala is registered in London.

Part voyages are also possible but the full 112-day round voyage from New York to Seattle and back, or vice versa, costs €11,200 (about $15,495 or £10,075). New York to Seattle is €6,000 (about $8,300 or £5,395) for 60 days and Seattle to New York €5,200 (about $7,195 or £4,675) for 52 days.

The next sailings from New York are by CMA CGM La Scala on August 7, CMA CGM Figaro on September 16 and CMA CGM Dalila on September 30, followed by CMA CGM La Scala again on November 25. Sailings from Seattle are by CMA CGM Dalila on August 8, CMA CGM La Scala on October 3, CMA CGM Figaro on November 14 and CMA CGM Dalila again on November 28. Departues from Vancouver take place three (3) days after Seattle and one-way fares to New York are €300 ($415 or £270) lower per person.

For further details please call Miri Lopusna at passenger agents The Cruise People Ltd in London on 020 7723 2450 or e-mail cruise@cruisepeople.co.uk.

A Long World Cruise From Oceania – Early World Cruises – And A Different Kind of World Cruise, By Container Ship

THE CRUISE EXAMINER at Cybercruises.com by Kevin Griffin

The Cruise Examiner for 29th July 2013

InsigniaWhile European lines such as Hapag-Lloyd Cruises have traditionally offered longer world cruises each winter, stretching up to 180 days, most English-speaking lines have stuck to a formula that sees world cruises come in at 105 to 110 days. Oceania Cruises, however, has chosen for its first world cruise in 2015 in the 30,277-ton Insignia, an extended 180-day itinerary. Ironically, the Insignia (shown above) will be coming back from a charter to Hapag-Lloyd, which has been operating her as its Columbus 2, in April 2014. We also take the opportunity of this announcement to look at some earlier world cruises, dating back to 1891 and 1909, and not just to the usually-quoted 1922 of Cunard Line’s Laconia. Finally, we look at an alternative world cruise that is offered year-round – this time by CMA CGM container ship!

THIS WEEK’S STORY                                                                         (See previous columns)

CruiseTricks Chooses Cruise People/CMA CGM Cargo-Passenger Route as one of its Top Ten Unusual Cruises in the World

The German site www.cruisetricks.de has chosen The Cruise People’s CMA CGM New York to Seattle route via Suez as one of its “Top Ten Unusual Cruises in the World” for 2011. In making its choice, CruiseTricks’s Franz Neumeier said,

“That the French company CMA CGM offers the possibility for up to seven passengers to travel on three of its cargo ships is not unusual. Many cargo ships carry passengers these days. What is unusual about the service offered by the CMA CGM Figaro, CMA CGM La Scala and CMA CGM Tosca, however, is that it follows the route of the first World Cruise undertaken by a passenger ship, as performed by Hamburg America Line’s Cleveland in 1909. These voyages can be booked through The Cruise People Ltd in London.”

The CMA CGM Tosca and fleetmates now connect New York and Seattle (as well as Vancouver BC) via the Suez Canal and Far East ports. © Kevin Quick

Three ships, the CMA CGM Figaro, CMA CGM La Scala and CMA CGM Tosca (shown right), now offer an interesting itinerary between New York and Seattle, as well as Vancouver BC, via the Suez Canal. Known as CMA CGM’s Columbus Loop, the full 112-day round voyage is made via ports in the Far East. Eastbound, ships leave New York via Norfolk and Savannah and sail directly to Tanjung Pelepas, a port in Malaysia located just across the water from Singapore. Calls are then made at Hong Kong, Yantian and Shanghai before proceeding to Pusan, in South Korea, and on to Seattle and Vancouver.

The return voyage is made from Vancouver to Yokohama and then calls at the Chinese ports of Shanghai, Ningbo, Hong Kong and Yantian before returning to New York via Tanjung Pelepas.

Voyage time from New York to Seattle is 60 days and from Seattle to New York 52 days (Vancouver to New York is 49 days). This voyage is for those who love the sea, the longest transit being 32 days from Savannah to Tanjung Pelepas (on the return, Tanjung Pelepas to New York is 23 days).

The new routing retraces the route of the first World Cruise, which was offered by Hamburg America Line’s Cleveland before the Panama Canal had even been opened – but takes half the time. Chartered by Frank C Clark of New York, an early cruise organizer, the Cleveland left New York on October 16, 1909, and took 108 days to proceed across the Atlantic to ports in the Mediterranean, Suez Canal, India and the Far East before finishing the world’s first Round-the-World Cruise in San Francisco on January 31, 1910. Passengers then returned to their homes from the West Coast by train while the Cleveland retraced her steps on a second world cruise. Equally, passengers taking the new Columbus Loop cruise can travel around the world in either direction and complete their circumnavigation in less than two months by making the rail journey across North America.

The CMA CGM Figaro and CMA CGM La Scala carry seven passengers each in three double cabins and one single, with fares set at €80 per person per day or €90 per day for sole occupancy of a double cabin. The CMA CGM Tosca carries up to eight passengers in three double cabins and two singles. Fares include full board, port charges, deviation insurance and complimentary French table wine with lunch and dinner. Part voyages are also possible but the full 105112-day round voyage starts at €8,960 (about $11,895 or £7,490). New York to Seattle is €4,800 (about $6,375 or £4,015) for 60 days and Seattle to New York is €4,160 (about $5,525 or £3,475) for 52 days.

For further details please call Miri Lopusna at The Cruise People Ltd in London on 020 7723 2450 or e-mail cruise@cruisepeople.co.uk.