Viking Orders Six Ocean Ships – Ponant Orders Two More Explorers – Star Order To Go To Dream Cruises

The Cruise Examiner for 12th March 2018

Viking Sky at Montreal T3 23.09.47 c. D Dubinsky

The 930-berth Viking Sky at Montreal, one of what will eventually be a class of sixteen ships.

Eight more cruise ships were ordered last week, bringing the total now on order to 100 according to Seatrade Cruise News. Viking Cruises ordered six 930-berth ocean-going cruise ships from Fincantieri for delivery between 2024 and 2027. In addition, Ponant ordered two more of its 184-berth “Explorer” class expedition ships for delivery in 2020. And Genting Hong Kong meanwhile announced the move of its first “Global” class cruise ship order from Star Cruises to its more upmarket Dream Cruises brand.

FOR THIS WEEK’S STORY                                                                                                           (See previous columns)

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Viking Star Floated Out At Marghera – A Return To Seagoing Tradition But Every Cabin With A Balcony

Viking StarLast week, Viking Cruises floated out its first ocean-going cruise ship, the 47,800-ton 930-berth Viking Star. This event marks the introduction of one of the most important cruise ships in some years. In one way, she marks a return to the roots of traditional cruising, where destinations and the sense of being at sea, rather than at some fun fair, are an important part of the cruise product. At the same time, she is a step forward as every passenger cabin on board comes with a balcony.

The ceremony took place on Monday, June 23, at Fincantieri’s Marghera shipyard near Venice. With four sister ships now under construction, Viking Star will be the first to debut, in May 2015 with maiden voyages in Scandinavia and the Baltic. The next to be introduced will be the Viking Sea and Viking Sky, while the fourth ship has yet to be named.

“Today is a proud day for our entire Viking family, as we are one step closer to launching a new era of ocean cruising,” said Viking Cruises Chairman Torstein Hagen last week. “Viking Star’s maiden season was sold out before she even touched water, which just demonstrates how enthusiastic our guests are for destination-focused ocean cruises.”

Following a two-day process that floated the Viking Star, she was moved to the nearbyfitting dock for final completion. At 745 by 95 feet, these new ships will be slightly larger than one of the world’s most famous cruise ships, the Green Goddess, otherwise known as Cunard Line’s 34,183-ton Caronia of 1949, which measured 715 x 91 feet and also carried 930 passengers.
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The new Viking ships will feature many premium amenities and services, including

– all cabins have a private balcony
– a two-deck high observation lounge at the forward end
– a complete walk-around promenade deck beneath the lifeboats and tenders
– the main dining room has floor-to-ceiling windows that slide open
– al fresco dining is available
– the first true infinity pool at sea
– the spa has been banished from deck 9 on top to deck 1 below.

Fort further details on booking a cruise on Viking Cruises new ocean ships please call The Cruise People Ltd in Europe on +44 (0)20 7723 2450 or e-mail cruise@cruisepeople.co.uk. or in North America 1-800-961-5536 or e-mail cruise@thecruisepeople.ca.

Viking Star Floated Out At Marghera – Saga Takes Space With MSC Cruises – And What Happened In 1914

THE CRUISE EXAMINER at Cybercruises.com by Kevin Griffin

The Cruise Examiner for 30th June 2014..

 

Berengaria,ex-Imperator

Hamburg America Line’s giant Imperator became Cunard Line’s Berengeria after the First World War

Last week saw the float out at Marghera of the latest thing in ocean cruising. Viking Cruises’ Viking Star is a ship that is very traditional and yet is right up to date, with every stateroom having a balcony and all modern luxuries. We also look at Saga’s move back into outsourcing cruises from Azamara Club Cruises, Celebrity Cruises, Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines and MSC Cruises, something it has not done in a major way since the 1990s. And we look back at passenger shipping a century ago, how the war delayed the building of fifteen liners, and how it would denude the Hamburg America Line of its six finest ships, from the Imperator to the Tirpitz.

FOR THIS WEEK’S STORY                                                                                          (See previous columns)