Boom In Expedition Ship Orders – Other Cruise News: A’Rosa Plans New River Ships – Swan Hellenic: Minerva Or Another?

The Cruise Examiner for 13th February 2017

hapag-lloyd-newbuildings-stern

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises has ordered two 16,100-ton 240-berth expedition cruise ships

Over the past year there has been a boom in expedition ship orders, with sixteen vessels now on order and options placed for at least five more. Of these, half a dozen will be Polar Class 6, built for summer/autumn operation in medium first-year ice, which may include old ice inclusions, in Arctic and Antarctic waters. Elsewhere, Rostock-based A’Rosa Cruises may be about to order additional river cruisers, while Swan Hellenic is looking for a replacement ship for the Minerva.

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All Leisure Cancels Voyager And Minerva Cruises – TUI Group Cruise Business Up – UK Minor Cruise Ports On The Rise

The Cruise Examiner for 2nd January 2017

minerva

Swan Hellenic’s Minerva was one of two All Leisure ships to have cruises cancelled this week

Today we have surprise news from All Leisure Group, who have just cancelled cruises scheduled to leave this week on Swan Hellenic’s Minerva from Marseille and on Voyages of Discovery’s Voyager from Port Kelang. Speculation has the two ships going to other operators and rumours so far have centred on Phoenix Reisen or Saga Cruises for the Minerva (both of which companies have operated this ship before) and an Asian operator or Celestyal Cruises for the Voyager. Meanwhile, TUI’s cruise business continues to thrive and we have a look at the latest cruise port news from Holyhead and Poole, two smaller cruise ports in the UK.

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Oceanwide Expeditions’ 180-berth Hondius – 50 Years Ago: The Jamaica Queen and Sunward – Saga’s Second Ship Still An Option

The Cruise Examiner for 28th November 2016

hondius

Oceanwide Expeditions plans to introduce its first newbuilding, the 180-berth Hondius, in 2019

Last week came news that Oceanwide Expeditions has ordered a new 180-berth expedition ship from the Brodosplit shipyard in Croatia for delivery in 2019. We also have a look back this week at events of fifty years ago that featured Arison Shipping and two ships, the short-lived Jamaica Queen and the somewhat longer-lived Sunward. These events precipitated not only the founding of Norwegian Cruise Line but also what later became today’s Carnival Group & plc. Finally, we have received a correction from Saga on the planning of their second new vessel.

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Twin Sister Ships For Hapag-Lloyd Cruises – Other Cruise News: New Ship For Cruceros Australis – Ugliness of the Seas

The Cruise Examiner for 29th August 2016

Hapag-Lloyd newbuildings

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises has announced plans for two 240-berth expedition cruise ships that will be the thrid and fourth in the world to be constructed to Polar Class. To be delivered in 2019, the as yet unnamed five-star ships will follow the Crystal Endeavour and Scenic Eclipse, due out in August 2018. Down Under in Chile, Cruceros Australis has meanwhile confirmed that it is building a 210-berth cruise ship at Chilean builders Asenav. And in general, we have a quick look at scrubbers on cruise ships.

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Expedition to the South Seas and Easter Island: A Voyage of Discovery in Hapag-Lloyd Cruises’ 175-Guest MS Hanseatic

Hanseatic

Itineraries that go beyond classic cruise routes – follow in the footsteps of James Cook and Ferdinand Magellan

  • Calls include the Tuamotu and Pitcairn Islands, plus Easter Island
  • Cruise dates: November 25 to December 19, 2016

With a length of approximately 404 feet, a beam of 59 feet and a capacity for 175 passengers, MS Hanseatic is a small expedition ship, ideal for visiting more remote destinations and ports that are virtually unexplored by tourists. As part of the Expedition to the South Seas and Easter Island, guests on board the 5-star* Hanseatic will travel to destinations including the Tuamotu Islands in the heart of French Polynesia, go on Zodiac landings and discover the Moai statues on Easter Island.

Expedition to the South Seas and Easter Island is a 24-nightcruise that follows in the wake of famous seafarers such as James Cook. In the 18th century, Cook embarked on three South Sea voyages and discovered a number of different islands there. For many of the guests, this cruise will also be full of firsts – for example, when the Hanseatic heads for the Tuamotu Islands, the world’s largest archipelago. This group of islands was discovered in 1521 by Ferdinand Magellan.

A further call will be made at Pitcairn, the only inhabited island in the archipelago of that name. Weather permitting, guests will land at Bounty Bay with the 14 Zodiacs – inflatable boats well suited to expeditions – and meet personally the descendants of the Bounty mutineers.

The highlight of the expedition will be the penultimate stop at Easter Island. The park where the Moai, the island’s famous stone sculptures, are situated is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A team of experts from different fields such as regional studies, cultural history, biology and geology will accompany the guests throughout the cruise. In lectures both on board and during the shore excursions and Zodiac excursions, these specialists will provide fascinating facts and insights about the different Polynesian peoples and the European expeditions of the 16th and 18th centuries.

MS Hanseatic – Expedition to the South Seas and Easter Island, from Tahiti to Puerto Montt, November 25 – December 19, 2016, 24 days, from €8,990 per person (£6,750, $10,790), cruise only. More information online at: http://www.hl-cruises.com/find-your-cruise/HAN1622

For further details or bookings please call Gay Scruton at The Cruise Peiople Ltd in London on +44 (0)20 7723 2450 or e-mail PassageEnquiry@aol.com.

The Northwest Passage: Yet Another Cruise Ship For 2017

The Cruise Examiner for 2nd May 2016

Seven Seas Navigator

The Seven Seas Navigator is a cruise ship that was built on an ice-strengthened hull

The fabled Northwest Passage took three years to cross when Raould Amundsen first traversed it from east to west in his Gjoa in 1903-06 and Henry Larsen of the RCMP made it the other way in the St Roch in 1940-42. A century later, however, large passenger ships such as the 43,524-ton residence ship The World and the 68,870-ton cruise ship Crystal Serenity are threatening to turn it into a tourist playground. Last week came news that yet another cruise ship, Regent Seven Seas Cruises’ 28,550-ton Seven Seas Navigator, would join the Crystal Serenity in making the passage in 2017. While Crystal sail from Seward to New York, Regent will be sailing from Seward to Montreal.

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The World’s First Cruise Ships – The New Hapag-Lloyd Cruises – Royal Caribbean To Donate $5 Million To World Wildlife Fund

The Cruise Examiner for 25th January 2016

Augusta Victoria colour
As Hapag-Lloyd Kreutzfahrten renamed itself Hapag-Lloyd Cruises last week, it celebrated the 125th Anniversary of its first cruise, which was offered on the 7,241-ton Augusta Victoria (model, top) in 1891. On the occasion of this event we look back at some of the world’s earliest cruise ships and cruise operations, which date back to the early 1880s. Meanwhile, Royal Caribbean Cruises and the World Wildlife Fund have announced a $5 million cooperation program to help ensure the long-term health of the world’s oceans.

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